I Trust You, You Trust Me: understanding the effects of trust on team performance.

trust youAs noted in a previous blog post, the dominant view amongst scholars is that team trust is beneficial for team performance. Trust helps team members to suspend their uncertainty and vulnerability in relation to teammates and allows them to work more effectively and efficiently, using their energy and resources in ways that contribute to team performance.

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Collective Behavior Algorithms and Group Size: dynamic choices are most accurate in small groups.

Collective behaviourGroup living is common across many species, and group sizes range from small (e.g., the Elephant herd and Lion pride) to very large (e.g., bird flocks or fish schools). Different species evolved varying group sizes under different environmental conditions but, one way or another, group living evolved because of its many benefits – a critical one being that the offspring of group members stand a better chance at survival due to the collective behavior of the group.

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A commentary on ‘Big Mind: how collective intelligence can change our world’ by Geoff Mulgan

geoffThere are many ways of thinking about human intelligence. The humorous quip you might hear on the street is that academics have generated so many ways of thinking about intelligence that the concept is now completely unintelligible. Still, talk of intelligence has not yet gone out of fashion. I recall sitting opposite a famous Scottish psychologist in an Edinburgh café, asking the question, How would you define intelligence? He answered succinctly with a smile: Intelligence is the ability to figure things out. His definition was as much an invitation to explore as anything else.

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Sabotage in Academia: understanding the nature and causes of sabotage in academia

Sabotage

Sabotage in the workplace is not something we think about every day, and it might seem strange to think about sabotage behaviours playing out in academic work settings.  Sabotage has been described as any form of behaviour that is intentionally designed to negatively affect service (Harris and Ogbonna, 2002 p. 166).  Worryingly, 85% of service employees consider sabotage to be an ‘everyday occurrence’ in their organisations (Harris and Ogbonna, 2002).  When researchers investigate employee performance in academia, they tend to focus on research performance (Edgar and Geare, 2011), or the relationship between research performance and teaching quality (Cadez et al., 2017).  They rarely think about sabotage. 
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